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  • Frustrated Newbie

    First, thank you for taking the time to read this. Any advise or comments are appriciated.

    After sitting for the second time I finally passed exam 1/P. I was so excited I thought I would burst, but as time went on that has faded. I have been applying non-stop for entry level possitions and I even have a head hunter helping me and I have not so much as heard one word from any of them. The day we got the results back I started the process and now im just frustrated. Ive never had to work this hard just to get a response before. Even someone saying "no thanks" would be better than just being ignored! What am I doing wrong? I have been only applying via the internet, and whatever work (sometimes i wonder) my headhunter is doing. Is there a better process to do this in? Unfortunatly no one at my college ever told me about being an actuary (didnt even know what one was till after i graduated) so I have been out of school for a bit now, im 26yrs old, and dont have any contacts in the field.

    So I ask again... what am I doing wrong? Should i be calling the companies and sending letters out?

    I suppose i just needed to vent a little frustration. Thank you for listening... and again any advise or comments are very welcome.

    Z

  • #2
    Originally posted by Zzasrix
    First, thank you for taking the time to read this. Any advise or comments are appriciated.

    After sitting for the second time I finally passed exam 1/P. I was so excited I thought I would burst, but as time went on that has faded. I have been applying non-stop for entry level possitions and I even have a head hunter helping me and I have not so much as heard one word from any of them. The day we got the results back I started the process and now im just frustrated. Ive never had to work this hard just to get a response before. Even someone saying "no thanks" would be better than just being ignored! What am I doing wrong? I have been only applying via the internet, and whatever work (sometimes i wonder) my headhunter is doing. Is there a better process to do this in? Unfortunatly no one at my college ever told me about being an actuary (didnt even know what one was till after i graduated) so I have been out of school for a bit now, im 26yrs old, and dont have any contacts in the field.

    So I ask again... what am I doing wrong? Should i be calling the companies and sending letters out?

    I suppose i just needed to vent a little frustration. Thank you for listening... and again any advise or comments are very welcome.

    Z
    Depending on where you live, it can really make the process difficult.

    Don't worry about your age - it's not a big thing. Career-changers in the actuarial field are not uncommon at all. However, understand that you are competing with other candidates that have majored in actuarial science and are graduating with 3-4 exams.

    I would say keep trying. Don't give up. Keep sending out those resumes and keep inquiring about positions - you'll get a contact sooner or later.

    PM me for more information.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't let HR touch your resumé. It'll be "processed" and "filed."
      Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

      Comment


      • #4
        Frustrated

        If you are looking only where you live, which I understand is Florida, this may be hard, because there are relatively few jobs there. The most jobs are in New England/New York area and the Midwest. If you expand your search nationwide, you will have better chances.

        Also, other things to do to improve your chances:
        - Pass more exams. Until you have three exams passed, having too many exams is not an obstacle. And exam FM is a very reasonable test.
        - Learn to do tricks with Excel (e.g., macros, vlookup, pivot tables) and to manage databases (e.g., Access).
        - If you want to work in a P/C company, learn SAS.
        - Get some VEE certifications (New England Actuarial Seminars is probably the cheapest way to go).
        - Finally, you might consider going back to graduate school for a year or so and taking some graduate classes in actuarial science, not necessarily to get a degree. As I see it, the best place to go is Illinois State, because this is where I teach those classes, but there are many places that have graduate programs -- look them up at www.beanactuary.org.

        And keep on applying, push it. If you like this field and you really want it, why not?
        By the way, studying for the third exam (SOA M especially, called so because M = Mother of all Exams) may be a good way to find out if you really like this field.
        Although many P/C actuaries are quite happy living their lives without any connection to multiple decrements, uniform distribution of deaths or constant force of mortality.

        All the best.
        Yours,
        Krzys'
        Last edited by krzysio; October 5 2005, 09:46 PM.
        Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

        Comment


        • #5
          An honest advice

          Hi,

          Why do you want to change your career? Are you 100% sure that actuary is the best career choice for YOURSELF? One of the reason might be you only pass one and you're not in school anymore. From SOA passing candidates list, you will get the answer why passing one exam is too less now although it's possible to fina an entry level job with one exam for U.S citizen or PR.

          The following is my advice:

          1. make sure you really want to be an actuary
          2. pass more exam, up to 3
          3. keep trying, you can contact companies by yourself, I got my offer after 8 monthes job hunting but it is normal for international student. Don't lose your confidence if you believe actuary is what you want to be
          4. good luck.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Terry
            2. pass more exam, up to 3
            I've heard that, or similar, several times: is it a negative to have passed too many exams?

            I'm taking Exam P next year, and am currently in my third (fifth, but only transferred 40/75 credits) semester in Applied Mathematics: Actuarial Science. I was planning on looking for possible internships for either Summer 2006 if I can, but definitely for Summer 2007 (I graduate in 2008).

            I was planning on definitely taking P and FM, and possibly M and C by the time I graduate, dependent upon my ability and time considerations (I work 30 hours a week during the school year, and attend full time). Would this be too much?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SirVLCIV
              I've heard that, or similar, several times: is it a negative to have passed too many exams?

              I'm taking Exam P next year, and am currently in my third (fifth, but only transferred 40/75 credits) semester in Applied Mathematics: Actuarial Science. I was planning on looking for possible internships for either Summer 2006 if I can, but definitely for Summer 2007 (I graduate in 2008).

              I was planning on definitely taking P and FM, and possibly M and C by the time I graduate, dependent upon my ability and time considerations (I work 30 hours a week during the school year, and attend full time). Would this be too much?
              Some people speculate about the imbalance between work experience and exam progress. Some people in college are skewed towards the exam progress, while there are those in the field that are skewed towards the work experience. If you have 4 exams passed, that should be fine. Any more than that, you may be running into that imbalance.

              Understand that these exams are big and difficult. I wish you nothing but the best of luck on these, but it's rare for someone to pass the first four exams without failing. This is a flawed analysis, but if you suppose that the empirical probability of passing each exam is about 40%, then to pass all 4 without failing = (0.4)^4 = 2.56%. Of course, some exam-takers are better than others, but you get the idea. As long as you put in the time you need to pass these exams and understand the concepts, you'll do fine.

              Comment


              • #8
                First you should not rely on any recruiter; with only one exam passed, you are not a good candidate for a recruiter; so, it's up to you. My suggestions:

                - Really look at your resume. Does it highlight the skills you have that would help you in the field like, computer experience (Excel and Access are biggies), business experience, etc? Is it well written? You post contains many spelling and grammatical errors, if your resume contains just one, then it's as good as in the trash.

                - Be proactive! Send your resume to the one doing the hiring, if you don't know who it is, then find out. Call the company so you'll know who to send the resume to. When you send your resume out, make sure it's on nice paper, in a nice envelope, and not folded. A week after you send your resume, call the company - show them you're interested. There are many talented people looking to get into the field, you need to stand out.

                - There's a good list of companies (with contact info) that have actuarial training programs at http://www.beanactuary.com/find/atp.cfm

                - Also, if you do live in Florida and want to stay, accept that it will take you a little longer than normal. I'm in Florida and it took me a few months to find a position here, so be patient, and while you’re waiting, keep studying.

                Good Luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I believe the balance between working experience and exam is important. If you an the empolyer, will you offer a job to a candidate with 5 exams or even ASA but only having one internship? I doubt it. In my opinion, one intern+2 or 3 exams is good enough
                  Originally posted by SirVLCIV
                  I've heard that, or similar, several times: is it a negative to have passed too many exams?

                  I'm taking Exam P next year, and am currently in my third (fifth, but only transferred 40/75 credits) semester in Applied Mathematics: Actuarial Science. I was planning on looking for possible internships for either Summer 2006 if I can, but definitely for Summer 2007 (I graduate in 2008).

                  I was planning on definitely taking P and FM, and possibly M and C by the time I graduate, dependent upon my ability and time considerations (I work 30 hours a week during the school year, and attend full time). Would this be too much?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SirVLCIV
                    I've heard that, or similar, several times: is it a negative to have passed too many exams?

                    I'm taking Exam P next year, and am currently in my third (fifth, but only transferred 40/75 credits) semester in Applied Mathematics: Actuarial Science. I was planning on looking for possible internships for either Summer 2006 if I can, but definitely for Summer 2007 (I graduate in 2008).

                    I was planning on definitely taking P and FM, and possibly M and C by the time I graduate, dependent upon my ability and time considerations (I work 30 hours a week during the school year, and attend full time). Would this be too much?
                    If you're passing exams b/c you're in college and it's part of your curriculum (or at least goes hand-in-hand), some might say it's not as bad as graduating and passing 3 or 4 exams on your own - the second way, employers might start wondering why you're not getting experience. (On the other hand - the way I prefer to look at it - it's a sign that you're definitely committed even though you're having trouble knocking the door down to get into the field.)

                    Put it this way - *at most* I'd suggest passing the first 4 exams. Anything after that is going to be a real problem b/c employers will not pay you for having more than 4 exams if you don't have experience to back it up.
                    "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

                    http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

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