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Should I major in Computer Science or Statistics?

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  • probability
    replied
    In any case, I think that actuaries who work
    in industry could probably get away with just a superficial understanding of calculus. After all,
    it's no longer being tested directly by the SOA or CAS.
    Last edited by probability; January 13 2010, 02:56 PM.

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  • NoMoreExams
    replied
    Originally posted by probability View Post
    Why limit(pun intended) this argument to multivariate calculus? A student will not gain a rigorous understanding of single variable calculus as well until he studies analysis.
    Isn't that what I said in my original post?

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  • probability
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    Hence the "if" in my original statement.
    Why limit(pun intended) this argument to multivariate calculus? A student will not gain a rigorous understanding of single variable calculus as well until he studies analysis.

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  • NoMoreExams
    replied
    Originally posted by probability View Post
    You're right, but what percentage of such students can be found in today's high schools?
    Hence the "if" in my original statement.

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  • probability
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    I'd wager any kid that can take Calc. 3 in high school can understand the basics of set theory/real analysis.
    You're right, but what percentage of such students can be found in today's high schools?

    Leave a comment:


  • NoMoreExams
    replied
    Originally posted by probability View Post
    Great idea. Maybe we should start having high school students take abstract algebra and measure-theoretic probability as well. That way they can be ready for the Ph.D.
    Qualifiying Exams by the time they're 18 and go directly from high school to graduate school.:wacko:
    I'd wager any kid that can take Calc. 3 in high school can understand the basics of set theory/real analysis.

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  • probability
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    One would argue if high schools started offering classes beyond calc. 2 that they should offer real analysis before calc. 3. A lot of kids coming out of a high school program do not understand calculus. And a lot of people will argue that to really understand calculus 3, you need linear algebra and some analysis/topology. In any case, most advanced math students will go on to major in math (at least from what I've seen) and they would benefit more from Real Analysis than trying to understand calc. 3.
    Great idea. Maybe we should start having high school students take abstract algebra and measure-theoretic probability as well.
    Last edited by probability; January 13 2010, 03:44 AM.

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  • mekosmowski
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    One would argue if high schools started offering classes beyond calc. 2 that they should offer real analysis before calc. 3. A lot of kids coming out of a high school program do not understand calculus. And a lot of people will argue that to really understand calculus 3, you need linear algebra and some analysis/topology. In any case, most advanced math students will go on to major in math (at least from what I've seen) and they would benefit more from Real Analysis than trying to understand calc. 3.
    I agree. I didn't start to understand calculus until real analysis.

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  • sohpmalvin
    replied
    Originally posted by R_T View Post
    Just about any moron can pass P!
    :shocked::embarrassed::wideyed:

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  • R_T
    replied
    ..........
    Last edited by R_T; February 10 2010, 04:27 PM. Reason: deleted

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  • NoMoreExams
    replied
    Originally posted by R_T View Post
    The only positive aspect of attainig a stats degree, as it applies to actuarial science, is that it will hopefully expose the student to SAS, which is important for Health & P&C
    work. If you are looking for a major that will teach you to think, I would put physics at the top of the list. As far as the stats material covered on the exams, anyone with half a brain can learn it on his own.
    Pass MLC and C on your first try, then talk about the material not being hard enough.

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  • NoMoreExams
    replied
    Originally posted by R_T View Post
    Most high school (and some college) students can't even handle calc 1.
    Moreover, most high school teachers aren't even qualified to teach real analysis! What country are you living in?
    And those kids probably won't end up working as actuaries. Obviously we are talking about a specific sample.

    And most high schools won't teach calc3 there, that's why kids go to a nearby college to do that... I took calc3 and vector calc my senior year at a university not too far from my high school.

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  • R_T
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    One would argue if high schools started offering classes beyond calc. 2 that they should offer real analysis before calc. 3. A lot of kids coming out of a high school program do not understand calculus. And a lot of people will argue that to really understand calculus 3, you need linear algebra and some analysis/topology. In any case, most advanced math students will go on to major in math (at least from what I've seen) and they would benefit more from Real Analysis than trying to understand calc. 3.
    Most high school (and some college) students can't even handle calc 1.
    Moreover, most high school teachers aren't even qualified to teach real analysis! What country are you living in?

    Leave a comment:


  • R_T
    replied
    ..........
    Last edited by R_T; February 10 2010, 04:26 PM. Reason: deleted

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  • R_T
    replied
    Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
    Of course a stats degree (a good one) will go beyond what actuarial exams cover. The point of stats or math degree or ...etc. is to broaden your horizons and teach you how to think. There are only so many exams, a good part of being a good actuary is coming up with quick ways to do ad-hoc requests.
    The only positive aspect of attainig a stats degree, as it applies to actuarial science, is that it will hopefully expose the student to SAS, which is important for Health & P&C
    work. If you are looking for a major that will teach you to think, I would put physics at the top of the list. As far as the stats material covered on the exams, anyone with half a brain can learn it on his own.

    Leave a comment:

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