Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Recent psychology grad - how to get started?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Recent psychology grad - how to get started?

    Hi guys--

    I read the stickies, but my situation may be a bit unique (or not ).


    Anyway, I recently graduated with a 3.8 from a top 10 private university.

    It's been about 4 months since graduation, and I've learned that having a degree in political science and psychology - despite having graduated with honors from an elite private school, and having had graduated in the top 1% of my high school class - isn't particularly impressive to employers.

    Anyhow, I have more interviews coming up, but I've been looking into a wide variety of career paths (I'm a bit directionless as to what career to pursue at the moment) - but I always see actuary appear as a fulfilling and creative career, and, well, it sounds very interesting!





    Anyhow - if you were in my shoes, what would be your game plan, if you were serious about becoming an actuary?

    Should I take a job now while studying for the prelim exams (the current jobs on the line are market analyst or research type positions).

    Or should I full-time study for exams, like super-study 10 hours a day, try to pass one and get an entry level job from there?

    Note: Although my majors seem to have nothing to do with math, econ, or statistics, I have EXCELLENT math abilities.

    I took multivariable calculus and differential equations, and Aced them both, though that was a few years ago. I got perfect math SAT and ACT scores, and was always the very best at math in my school, like the #1 guy. I've also taken several stats courses. In college, though, of course I decided to pursue other interests.

    I've taken a couple bare-bones economics courses - though my two roommates throughout college were econ majors, and some of the things they learned - econometrics, and such - seem like they would be very, very difficult to master in a month or 2 month's time.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated guys, thanks!
    Last edited by ParkerBro; September 22 2010, 02:39 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ParkerBro View Post
    Hi guys--

    I read the stickies, but my situation may be a bit unique (or not ).


    Anyway, I recently graduated with a 3.8 from a top 10 private university.

    It's been about 4 months since graduation, and I've learned that having a degree in political science and psychology - despite having graduated with honors from an elite private school, and having had graduated in the top 1% of my high school class - isn't particularly impressive to employers.

    Anyhow, I have more interviews coming up, but I've been looking into a wide variety of career paths (I'm a bit directionless as to what career to pursue at the moment) - but I always see actuary appear as a fulfilling and creative career, and, well, it sounds very interesting!





    Anyhow - if you were in my shoes, what would be your game plan, if you were serious about becoming an actuary?

    Should I take a job now while studying for the prelim exams (the current jobs on the line are market analyst or research type positions).

    Or should I full-time study for exams, like super-study 10 hours a day, try to pass one and get an entry level job from there?

    Note: Although my majors seem to have nothing to do with math, econ, or statistics, I have EXCELLENT math abilities.

    I took multivariable calculus and differential equations, and Aced them both, though that was a few years ago. I got perfect math SAT and ACT scores, and was always the very best at math in my school, like the #1 guy. I've also taken several stats courses. In college, though, of course I decided to pursue other interests.

    I've taken a couple bare-bones economics courses - though my two roommates throughout college were econ majors, and some of the things they learned - econometrics, and such - seem like they would be very, very difficult to master in a month or 2 month's time.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated guys, thanks!
    Study, sit for, and pass a couple of exams. Exam P/1 is offered 6 times a year or so, so that would be a good start. You may find that the exams are harder than your math courses. Passing them would show you and a potential employer that you are as good as you think you are. Failing a couple of attempts may encourage you to pursue a different path.

    Comment


    • #3
      Okay, the P/1 looks like the test I probably have the best shot at passing right now, as someone with a more pure math/ stat background that much econ.

      It involves heavy calculus and probability, both of which I understand pretty well (though I'll still need to study for 100-200 hours, at least).

      Next one is Nov 16th or so, in less than two months.

      Registration closes Oct 5th, so I have two weeks to decide officially.


      I would register in a heartbeat, but it does cost $200. -_-

      That, and if I do take a job in the mean time, I'm not exactly sure where I'll be on test date. Hmm.. well I guess I have some things to consider.

      Comment

      Working...
      X