Banner Ad 1

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Would I be able to pass the first exam as a highschool student?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Would I be able to pass the first exam as a highschool student?

    Hello
    I am a grade 11 student and I have decided to be an actuary when I'm older.
    I excel at math, and have the grades to get into a good actuarial science program.
    My question is whether I would be able to study for and pass the probability exam during the upcoming summer. I will have three months off where I will be doing nothing, and I would love to get a head start on my career. There is an exam in early September which I could sign up for. My questions are as follows
    Would it be possible for me to take and possibly pass this first exam?
    Is there a required age to take an exam?
    Would I need any other math courses to take the first exam, or would studying alone be good enough?
    Open to all responses, thanks!

  • #2
    What level of math have you taken up to?

    Exam P, typically the first exam taken, utilizes Calculus I, II, and III material. Exam P is on Probability (ie the Theory of Statistics). If you're just now getting to Pre-calc or Calc I, don't fret! I'm just telling you the truth, but, the other side to the truth is that you can have a tremendous head start if you become driven to learn at this young of an age. If my assumptions are incorrect, and you have taken the full Calculus sequence, then yes you may start studying for P this summer. If you haven't, a few possible options you have to get ahead include: independently study for your upcoming Math courses, independently study Statistics, take Math and/or Statistics your senior year of high school, and do more research into what courses to take throughout your college career. If your goal is to get P out of the way ASAP, then set yourself up to learn Calculus and Probability ASAP; it's really that simple. The devotion to learning is what most people lack.

    Overall, you're very young and shouldn't worry too much about studying 5 hours/day like the older actuarial students. You're ahead of the curve just by planning what college courses to take.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by younggun View Post
      Hello
      I am a grade 11 student and I have decided to be an actuary when I'm older.
      I excel at math, and have the grades to get into a good actuarial science program.
      My question is whether I would be able to study for and pass the probability exam during the upcoming summer. I will have three months off where I will be doing nothing, and I would love to get a head start on my career. There is an exam in early September which I could sign up for. My questions are as follows
      Would it be possible for me to take and possibly pass this first exam?
      Is there a required age to take an exam?
      Would I need any other math courses to take the first exam, or would studying alone be good enough?
      Open to all responses, thanks!
      I'll try to answer your questions in order:

      1) Three months is more than enough time to study and pass 1/P provided you have the prereqs. If you do not, it will depend how smart you are / how much you can teach yourself. There are study manuals that will help you.

      2) There is no required age to take an exam.

      3) Whether or not you need college courses will depend on what you have taken, how well you can teach yourself, etc. Those are things YOU need to decide.

      For every exam there is a syllabus, sample questions, released exams. You need to go look through those and judge for yourself. I would start at www.beanactuary.org

      Comment


      • #4
        Being from Manitoba, Canada, my current math courses are called Pre-cal 30s and ap calculus 32s.
        I'm in grade 11 (so I guess that makes me a junior?). I would assume the pre-cal course would be generally the same as in the States.
        As for the ap calculus course, it covers calculus I and some II material.
        I would love to get ahead, but would this math be enough to be able to self teach the rest? On another note my parents are both engineers, so they would be able to help me with any required calculus. Any thoughts on this?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by younggun View Post
          Being from Manitoba, Canada, my current math courses are called Pre-cal 30s and ap calculus 32s.
          I'm in grade 11 (so I guess that makes me a junior?). I would assume the pre-cal course would be generally the same as in the States.
          As for the ap calculus course, it covers calculus I and some II material.
          I would love to get ahead, but would this math be enough to be able to self teach the rest? On another note my parents are both engineers, so they would be able to help me with any required calculus. Any thoughts on this?
          I never wrote AP exam. I don't know of its difficulty.

          Knowledge of Calculus I, II and III is required. You have to feel comfortable with doing a lot of derivatives and integrations.

          Many people study for actuarial exams by themselves. You may try it yourself.

          You are better to ask your parents yourself for the last question.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think, by taking courses in mathematics may be further maximize your preparation. and I think, you certainly could. keep spirit!!
            I am a sad loser with no life.

            Comment

            Working...
            X