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Major Switch, what do you guys think?

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  • Major Switch, what do you guys think?

    Hey guys, I want to keep as many options open as possible, so I am considering jumping from an Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) and Economics double major to being an AMS and Mathematics double major with a minor in economics.

    i want to keep my actuary option open ( the AMS major has courses for the first exam and a whole course dedicated to interest theory) and i might also want to go to grad school and get my Ph.D in either applied math or mathematics.

    btw, i bought the fall 2005 study manual for Exam P, ''', it is a subpar manual. I think you need textbooks as well to supplement the learning. the manuals are only really good for review and good practice problems and practice exams. just my .02

    thanks guy

  • #2
    Originally posted by JaZon827
    Hey guys, I want to keep as many options open as possible, so I am considering jumping from an Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) and Economics double major to being an AMS and Mathematics double major with a minor in economics.

    i want to keep my actuary option open ( the AMS major has courses for the first exam and a whole course dedicated to interest theory) and i might also want to go to grad school and get my Ph.D in either applied math or mathematics.

    btw, i bought the fall 2005 study manual for Exam P, ''', it is a subpar manual. I think you need textbooks as well to supplement the learning. the manuals are only really good for review and good practice problems and practice exams. just my .02

    thanks guy
    An applied mathematics and statistics major along with a math major might be too narrow a focus, but maybe not. It will probably boil down to personal preference, but if you really want to keep more options open, the Economics major (or some other major for that matter) might be a better choice. I'm almost positive you could still get into a solid graduate school without having both these AMS and Mathematics majors; you could always major in AMS, take a few more advanced math classes, while not minoring in Mathematics, and strive for a good score on the GREs, which tests subject areas such as advanced calculus, topology, matrix algebra, etc. And I don't know how far along you are, but after taking a few classes you may even like Economics enough to major in it. I took one class somewhat whimsically during my freshman year and will end up minoring in it come May.

    By the way, which manual did you buy? I'm sorry to hear that you think this, but maybe you could give more input to others as to why you feel it is "subpar".
    act justly. walk humbly. .

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    • #3
      Originally posted by .Godspeed.
      An applied mathematics and statistics major along with a math major might be too narrow a focus, but maybe not. It will probably boil down to personal preference, but if you really want to keep more options open, the Economics major (or some other major for that matter) might be a better choice. I'm almost positive you could still get into a solid graduate school without having both these AMS and Mathematics majors; you could always major in AMS, take a few more advanced math classes, while not minoring in Mathematics, and strive for a good score on the GREs, which tests subject areas such as advanced calculus, topology, matrix algebra, etc. And I don't know how far along you are, but after taking a few classes you may even like Economics enough to major in it. I took one class somewhat whimsically during my freshman year and will end up minoring in it come May.

      By the way, which manual did you buy? I'm sorry to hear that you think this, but maybe you could give more input to others as to why you feel it is "subpar".
      thanks for the reply Godspeed, i appreciate it.

      i agree the Economics major keeps a bunch of options open in terms of business schools, ie getting an MBA. but i have zero interest in an MBA. if i would go to grad school, i would try to get a doctorate in either mathematics or physics.

      im still debating what to do, the AMS/ECO double major is a lot easier than AMS/MAT.

      the manual I purchased was the Actex Fall 2005 Exam P study manual. it's not a bad manual if you have met the prerequisites of knowing basic probability and statistics, however, if you are trying to learn from scratch like i am, it gets pretty tough. i'd reccomend to anyone, if you can find an older edition of one of the reccomended textbooks, buy those and supplement your actuarial training with the broad study manual with great review questions and get the theory down pat with the more friendly textbooks.

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