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  • Mature Student

    Hello All,
    I have passed 2 actuarial exams ( math and statistics ) in 1984 and 1986 and having a young family moved on to IT.
    I have worked 5 years in general insurance: operation research, actuarial - ratemaking and quality assurance of the huge auto/personal lines system conversion project. I've worked 15 months in the quality assurance of life insurance merger ( Sunlife and Clarica - Canada ) Beside these I've worked in the brokerage/investment and retail banking and debit/credit cards settlement projects.
    I have passed Canadian Security Course/Options and Futures Trading Courses/Project Management Profession designation of PMI.
    In my last assignment I was a QA Strategist/QA Program Manager.
    I am a fit and healthy, 51 years young woman who plans to live until 160 years of age at least. And work until 110 years of age.
    A BIG QUESTION:
    Who knows somebody who persused the actuarial career in the later part of the professional life? And how should I plan to go about it?
    Any ideas will be greatly appreciated!

    M

  • #2
    Question: How many days are in a year?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mborkowska
      Hello All,
      I have passed 2 actuarial exams ( math and statistics ) in 1984 and 1986 and having a young family moved on to IT.
      I have worked 5 years in general insurance: operation research, actuarial - ratemaking and quality assurance of the huge auto/personal lines system conversion project. I've worked 15 months in the quality assurance of life insurance merger ( Sunlife and Clarica - Canada ) Beside these I've worked in the brokerage/investment and retail banking and debit/credit cards settlement projects.
      I have passed Canadian Security Course/Options and Futures Trading Courses/Project Management Profession designation of PMI.
      In my last assignment I was a QA Strategist/QA Program Manager.
      I am a fit and healthy, 51 years young woman who plans to live until 160 years of age at least. And work until 110 years of age.
      A BIG QUESTION:
      Who knows somebody who persused the actuarial career in the later part of the professional life? And how should I plan to go about it?
      Any ideas will be greatly appreciated!

      M
      I don't know of anyone personally that fits your profile, mborkowska, but if you feel that you would like to enter the actuarial profession at this point in time, best of luck to you.

      Since you've passed your exams back in the mid-80's, I believe your exam transfers to the current Course 1/Exam P, and possibly some PD (Professional Development) credits. You may request a document that states what your prior progress through the exams translates to in the 2005 conversion.

      As for getting a job, you may want to go through a recruiter (of which there are many at the top of the page), or you may want to contact departments on your own. This can be done by looking through the CAS/SOA directory and finding the phone numbers of actuaries in your area.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you really think you are going to be working long enough for it to pay off, I say go for it. If not, you can always get a job doing actuarial work without the fancy designation.

        Product pricing for example may be a good option. I know some very smart pricers that do not have exams but do actuarial work regularly.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SirVLCIV
          Question: How many days are in a year?
          depends on the year

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanx PhillyP, for the kind words...What compensation can one get without the designa

            Originally posted by PhillyP
            If you really think you are going to be working long enough for it to pay off, I say go for it. If not, you can always get a job doing actuarial work without the fancy designation.

            Product pricing for example may be a good option. I know some very smart pricers that do not have exams but do actuarial work regularly.

            Thanx PhillyP, for the kind words...What compensation can one get without the designa

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wat
              I don't know of anyone personally that fits your profile, mborkowska, but if you feel that you would like to enter the actuarial profession at this point in time, best of luck to you.

              Since you've passed your exams back in the mid-80's, I believe your exam transfers to the current Course 1/Exam P, and possibly some PD (Professional Development) credits. You may request a document that states what your prior progress through the exams translates to in the 2005 conversion.

              As for getting a job, you may want to go through a recruiter (of which there are many at the top of the page), or you may want to contact departments on your own. This can be done by looking through the CAS/SOA directory and finding the phone numbers of actuaries in your area.
              Thank you for your kind words...I will check it out. M

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mborkowska
                Thanx PhillyP, for the kind words...What compensation can one get without the designa
                I do not know, maybe someone else can help? Maybe search job search sites to get an idea of how much?

                Comment

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