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re-entering the workforce

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  • re-entering the workforce

    I have been a stay-at-home mom for the last 4 years. I graduated with a BS in Chemistry and Math in 1997 and did work in a labratory as a chemist and statistician before having children. I am looking to re enter the work force and am very interested in persuing actuary. I have a lot of math background, obviously, but I'm a little (maybe a lot) rusty. I was thinking of auditing an undergraduate course at our local college this summer to reenergize that part of my brain again. I have started reviewing my old text, but it is slow going. Would you suggest I go back to a Calculas class or statistics?

    What other prep do you suggest? I did pull a sample test off the internet and attempted to do it, but I was all but totally lost, so I know I need refreshment before attempting the study the real thing.

  • #2
    Originally posted by gbarber
    I have been a stay-at-home mom for the last 4 years. I graduated with a BS in Chemistry and Math in 1997 and did work in a labratory as a chemist and statistician before having children. I am looking to re enter the work force and am very interested in persuing actuary. I have a lot of math background, obviously, but I'm a little (maybe a lot) rusty. I was thinking of auditing an undergraduate course at our local college this summer to reenergize that part of my brain again. I have started reviewing my old text, but it is slow going. Would you suggest I go back to a Calculas class or statistics?

    What other prep do you suggest? I did pull a sample test off the internet and attempted to do it, but I was all but totally lost, so I know I need refreshment before attempting the study the real thing.
    It depends. If you're able to remember how to do integration by parts and multivariable integration, you might be set for the calculus side. If you felt lost during the practice exam, you should probably look into taking a calculus-based probability class (if you'd like to sit in on a class). If not, then there are study manuals that will help you review/learn the requisite information. Dr. Ostazsewski is the author of one such manual - the ASM manual, I believe. It sounds like a good investment. If you've already taken a class with calculus-based probability, then I'd recommend that you get one of these manuals to review.

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    • #3
      I would start with a thorough review of calculus. Even though calculus is not directly tested anymore it is still very important. Integrating areas and volumes in two and three dimensions is a must know, as well as series and limits. I also would not skip linear algebra, and to a lesser extent differential calculus. At the very least know your matrix algebra. In later exams you will be tested on continuous time Markhov (sp?) chains and continuous time option models which requires a background in differential calculus, these can be very confusing and difficult.

      Pick up a good study manual. I believe one of the more active posters on this board is an author, you might want to consider one of his. It's always nice to be able to ask the source when you get stuck.

      Although I have already passed a number of exams I find myself rusty at calculus. In my spare time I will pick up my old textbook and work through the chapters. I have found it's like riding a bike, a little slow to absorb at the beginning but it always comes back after a while.

      Goodluck.

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