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  • How much study time?

    OK...I'm going after 3 in November. Some of the people in the office can't believe that I'm starting to study now - they aren't going to start for another 3-4 weeks. So...just how much time do I need to get ready (besides the standard 300-400 hours response), and how late is too late to start studying?

    On a semi-related note...I've heard that 3 and 4 sort-of relate to each other. If I don't get 3 in November, would it be wise to go after both 3 and 4 in May?
    "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

    http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Irish Blues
    OK...I'm going after 3 in November. Some of the people in the office can't believe that I'm starting to study now - they aren't going to start for another 3-4 weeks. So...just how much time do I need to get ready (besides the standard 300-400 hours response), and how late is too late to start studying?

    On a semi-related note...I've heard that 3 and 4 sort-of relate to each other. If I don't get 3 in November, would it be wise to go after both 3 and 4 in May?
    It's reasonable to begin now. I'd say the standard is a good mark to strive for. When it comes down to it, it really depends on how comfortable you are with the material, not the time spent. However, you may have to keep track of your hours for your actuarial student program. Our program stipulates that you must put in one hour of your own time for every company hour that is allotted for you.

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    • #3
      I said I'd go for M and C this November, but looking at the syllabi, I'll tackle only C. Starting with the most time available is always a good strategy. Although, it's really hard to get the motivation to study for that exam when my results for P and FM haven't been released.

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      • #4
        Yeah, I'm pretty sure I'm just going for C now rather than both C and M (or CAS 3, perhaps?), though I'll probably at least look over some of the M stuff so I'm not totally cold when I eventually take it. A chance for one pass with full preparation seems better than chancing with half-hearted preparation for two passes and winding up with two 5's.
        act justly. walk humbly. .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by .Godspeed.
          Yeah, I'm pretty sure I'm just going for C now rather than both C and M (or CAS 3, perhaps?), though I'll probably at least look over some of the M stuff so I'm not totally cold when I eventually take it. A chance for one pass with full preparation seems better than chancing with half-hearted preparation for two passes and winding up with two 5's.
          I couldn't agree more.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wat
            It's reasonable to begin now. I'd say the standard is a good mark to strive for. When it comes down to it, it really depends on how comfortable you are with the material, not the time spent. However, you may have to keep track of your hours for your actuarial student program. Our program stipulates that you must put in one hour of your own time for every company hour that is allotted for you.
            I sweated out 2 in November '04, it was the first time in years that I walked out of an exam not knowing if I had passed or not....and I didn't like that feeling. One manager said told me that getting better than 6 is a sign that you've studied too much...but I'd rather study too much and walk out feeling good than not study enough and have that feeling of possible doom again.

            I think if I can get through the life contingencies part, the rest should fall into place - I'll need a review of the statistics section and I'll need to go over the material in "Loss Models" yet, but the life contingencies part is what scares me right now.
            "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

            http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Irish Blues
              I sweated out 2 in November '04, it was the first time in years that I walked out of an exam not knowing if I had passed or not....and I didn't like that feeling. One manager said told me that getting better than 6 is a sign that you've studied too much...but I'd rather study too much and walk out feeling good than not study enough and have that feeling of possible doom again.

              I think if I can get through the life contingencies part, the rest should fall into place - I'll need a review of the statistics section and I'll need to go over the material in "Loss Models" yet, but the life contingencies part is what scares me right now.
              To be honest, it's not all that bad. If you study it enough, you'll find that life contingencies tends to follow this nice basic framework. I'd tell you the main principles now, but it'll be easier to comprehend and retain once you've seen the life contingencies material a couple of times.

              The Loss Models material sometimes takes a little creativity. For this past Exam M, it was a couple of Loss Models questions that gave me a few problems. For the most part, I understood the life contingencies questions. But LC makes up the majority of the syllabus (I've heard up to 55% - 65% of the exam).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wat
                The Loss Models material sometimes takes a little creativity. For this past Exam M, it was a couple of Loss Models questions that gave me a few problems. For the most part, I understood the life contingencies questions. But LC makes up the majority of the syllabus (I've heard up to 55% - 65% of the exam).
                That's on the SOA exams, on the CAS it's supposed to be about 20-25% while statistics (hypothesis testing, least squares fits, etc. etc. etc.) is 30-35%. Somehow though, I don't think that part will be too bad since I've seen most of the stuff. I haven't seen life contingencies or most of the rest of the material...and the last thing I want to do is throw away possible gimmes in a section that has the heaviest weight on the exam.
                "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

                http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Irish Blues
                  That's on the SOA exams, on the CAS it's supposed to be about 20-25% while statistics (hypothesis testing, least squares fits, etc. etc. etc.) is 30-35%. Somehow though, I don't think that part will be too bad since I've seen most of the stuff. I haven't seen life contingencies or most of the rest of the material...and the last thing I want to do is throw away possible gimmes in a section that has the heaviest weight on the exam.
                  I think the %ages are switched. I've seen it quoted that statistics represents 1/4 of the test, while LC represents still a major part of the syllabus (probably about 1/3).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Irish Blues
                    That's on the SOA exams, on the CAS it's supposed to be about 20-25% while statistics (hypothesis testing, least squares fits, etc. etc. etc.) is 30-35%. Somehow though, I don't think that part will be too bad since I've seen most of the stuff. I haven't seen life contingencies or most of the rest of the material...and the last thing I want to do is throw away possible gimmes in a section that has the heaviest weight on the exam.
                    http://casact.org/admissions/syllabus/2005/exam3.htm

                    The link has the syllabus for the test and a percentage breakdown of the topics covered. I haven't taken this test, but it looks like there is still a significant amount of Bowers (Life Contingencies).
                    Last edited by .Godspeed.; June 23 2005, 12:07 AM.
                    act justly. walk humbly. .

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                    • #11
                      Everyone seems to take C before M. Is that just because it's jointly administered? or is it accepted that the material for it is easier? I honestly haven't had any courses in any of it so it all looks greek (okay, not ALL) at this point.

                      Thanks,

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