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  • passing score?

    Hi guys,
    I hope everyone's studying is going well. Good luck!! Does anyone know whether there is a passing score or whether you have to be in the top so and so percentile. I'v heard a 6/10 and the top 30th %ile. I'm not sure which one it is, or whether either is correct.
    Thanks!
    Michelle

  • #2
    All I have heard is that a 6/10 will probably do, and a 7/10 is pretty certain.

    The rest of the talk has been that there is no set passing oercentile, but that those who show enough knowledge of the material will pass, no matter how few or how many that is.

    Looking back at the previous passing percentages that seems to ring true.
    Proper prior planning prevents poor performance!

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    • #3
      6/10 is the passing score. There's no probably about it.
      Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

      Comment


      • #4
        60%?

        Originally posted by Ken
        6/10 is the passing score. There's no probably about it.
        Do you have an official source for that? There has been such a proposal, but I am not sure it it has been approved.

        Yours,
        Krzys'
        Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by krzysio
          Do you have an official source for that? There has been such a proposal, but I am not sure it it has been approved.

          Yours,
          Krzys'
          Are you saying that sometimes a 6 doesn't pass?
          Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

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          • #6
            60%?

            Originally posted by Ken
            Are you saying that sometimes a 6 doesn't pass?
            A score of 6 does not correspond to 60% correct answers. I am saying that sometimes 60% correct answers is not enough to pass. There have been proposals floated to make 60% correct answers a passing score, but I do not know of this being an official policy.

            Yours,
            Krzys'
            Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

            Comment


            • #7
              Question #123

              Originally posted by nowlip
              I'd like to ask a quick question..

              In 123 Problems,
              73. An actuary models the lifetime of a device using the random variable Y = 10X^(0.8),
              where X is an exponential random variable with mean 1 year.
              Determine the probability density function f(y), for y > 0, of the random variable Y.
              Answer: 0.125(0.1y)^0.25 * e^−( (0.1y)^1.25 )
              Solution: F(y) = Pr[Y<=y] = ... Therefore, f(y) = F'(y) = [[Answer]]
              ---
              What is the explanation that I cannot directly solve this using,
              f(y) = Pr[Y=y] = ... ?

              Thanks~~
              I think, by f(y) we usually mean pdf and NOT cdf. So f(y) cannot equal P(Y<= y). f(y) is the derivative of F(y)= P(Y<= y) with respect to y.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cutie09185
                Hi guys,
                I hope everyone's studying is going well. Good luck!! Does anyone know whether there is a passing score or whether you have to be in the top so and so percentile. I'v heard a 6/10 and the top 30th %ile. I'm not sure which one it is, or whether either is correct.
                Thanks!
                Michelle
                Better idea: get as many as you can correct, and don't worry about whether or not 60% is enough. If you shoot for 18/30, you're more likely to end up at 16/30 or 15/30 and hurt your chances of passing. Shoot for more like 24/30 (or even better, 30/30) and then if you fall short, you'll probably be around 20/30 or 21/30 and likely have a passing score.

                There is a proposal from the SOA to make 60% a guaranteed pass, but it's contingent on the exam being SOA-only and there being no defective questions. I'm not sure how that would apply to the joint SOA/CAS exams. No matter what, don't count on 60% being a guaranteed pass. Get 70% or more and leave no doubt about it.
                "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

                http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Exactly. I'm shooting for 30/30, and even though I'm bound to miss some due to stupid mistakes, or due to curveballs, I should -definitely- have more than 22-24.

                  I would never dream of getting less than 80% on a class exam; why settle for less on a certification exam?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My curiosity about the grading standard does not reflect the score that I'm shooting for.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cutie09185
                      My curiosity about the grading standard does not reflect the score that I'm shooting for.
                      Then it shouldn't matter what the passing score is. You should be focused only on doing your best and letting the passing score fall wherever it falls.

                      Seriously. If it's 18/30 or if it's "top 35%", that should have no bearing on how you approach this or any other exam. Do your best - after that, it's out of your hands.
                      "You better get to living, because dying's a pain in the ***." - Frank Sinatra

                      http://www.hockeybuzz.com/blogger_ar...blogger_id=174 - where I talk about the Blues and the NHL.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nowlip
                        Yeah- but why can't we do this:

                        f(y) = Pr[Y=y] = ...

                        Rather than doing this:

                        f(y) = F'(y) = (d/dy)*Pr[Y<=y] = Pr[Y=y] ... ?

                        What is the reason of going through the bold part?
                        ( I know that the answer comes incorrect if we do the first method but I do not know why we're doing that. )
                        I believe that in continuous distributions, there is no such thing as the probability (X=x). The area of a line is 0. The only thing available in cont. is either P(X<x) or P(X>x).
                        So transforming a variable with Pr(X=x) Y=2X, Pr(Y=y)=Pr(X=y/2) makes no sense.
                        Last edited by mreevit; February 22 2006, 10:05 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          what i think, as well as the answer to that transformation question

                          First, if you score a 6/10 on an exam that means you scored 100-110% of the passing score (therefore a 6 passes). Scoring 60% of the questions correct could put you in a bad place, maybe if your lucky you will pass, but it matters on the exam, I couldn't see someone getting 15 questions on FM and still passing.

                          I would say on FM you need at least 70% (18/30 rounded up) to pass and I looked around and people said around 70% for P (21/30).

                          And back to that transformation question. Your problem is that it is a continuous r.v., therefore the P[Y=y] is zero. So what it does is since
                          f(y)=F'(y), then you can find F(y), take the derivative and find your answer. This is able to be found only because your Y=10X^.8 is strictly increasing. So you can find F(y) by finding F(x).
                          Last edited by jakebala; July 26 2006, 01:43 PM.

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                          • #14
                            So it definitely works like that for scores above a 6?
                            What if passing is 23/30. Would that mean you can't get a 10 or would they default to a perfect paper being 10?

                            6: 23 - 25.3
                            7: 25.3 - 27.6
                            8: 27.6 - 29.9
                            9: ???
                            10: ???

                            Not that any of this matters assuming you get a 6 but I'm curious.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This might not make sense but...

                              According to this post (by Wat) in the Exam FM section of these forums, the passing grade out of 40 was 24. Assuming they use the same percentage and grading scheme (I can only describe THAT type of grading system as a "scheme"), maybe the 30 question exam would be graded as follows:

                              Set 18 (30 * 0.6) as the passing grade, then follow Wat's rules (+/- 1 point for each 10% up or down). Thus:

                              [00.00 , 10.63) = 0
                              [10.63 , 11.81) = 1
                              [11.81 , 13.12) = 2
                              [13.12 , 14.58) = 3
                              [14.58 , 16.20) = 4
                              [16.20 , 18.00) = 5
                              [18.00 , 19.80) = 6
                              [19.80 , 21.78) = 7
                              [21.78 , 23.96) = 8
                              [23.96 , 26.35) = 9
                              [26.35 , 30.00) = 10

                              If this is correct, then you only need 18 correctly answered questions to pass. This should affect your strategy! You can choose 12 questions to NOT answer, thus giving yourself (on average) 72 more minutes, and presumably still pass. For the 12 "unanswered questions" you have two options:
                              1. Answer them! (If you answered your 18 questions and still have time left)
                              2. Guess! If there are 5 choices per question, then you're expected to pick up two extra questions!


                              In any case, I do not believe that trying to answer every question correctly is the best strategy. Certainly not when the level of difficulty between questions can be - and judging by the posts here hehe, I'd say ARE - very large.

                              Sadly, I've had to learn to test like this because I am so accident prone.

                              Of course, this is all completely moot if that *cough* scheme is not how the test is graded.

                              - junk

                              PS Great site! (first post wheeee)

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