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  • pilot questions

    Originally posted by wat
    If I'm not mistaken, and there's a chance I could be, the pilot questions do not count towards your score.

    Let's suppose there were 3 pilot questions in all. That means that there are 27 that count, 3 that don't. If you did indeed get 18 correct, you could have anywhere between 15/27 = 56% and 18/27 = 67%.

    And don't feel bad - everyone has trouble with actuarial exams. Don't get discouraged if someone comes on this discussion board and goes, "''' - I studied for 10 hours and got a 10! These exams are easy!", because for every one of those, there's 100 other actuarial students that are struggling through the same concepts.
    Wat,

    I have a question about those pilot questions. Could you able to find the answer (or right answer) from those pilot questions?? or do they have answer?? IF they have the answer for those pilot questions, and IF I made the answer what they have, then that question still doesn't count??

    Yeah, I was discouraged after i finished the exam. Even it was my first time for exam P, but i really spent a lot of time to study. I just know how to do only 24 questions, and that's no guarantee I can get all 24 questions right (because i don't have time to finish the rest, i just guess the answer).

    Do u think I am in trouble or I am in good shape?
    That's the way I think: If I made some stupid mistake on 5 questions out of 24, and i guess all 6 wrong. I just got 19 right and I pretty much get 4-5 points.

    And if some of you guys didn't do good this time, learn from your mistake, do more practice to improve your mistake. I believe practice can make people perfect.
    Tears stream down your face
    I promise you I will learn from my mistakes

  • #2
    The pilot questions don't count for or against you. I think you're on the bubble.
    Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

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    • #3
      Thanks for your reply, Ken

      I think so too...........
      Tears stream down your face
      I promise you I will learn from my mistakes

      Comment


      • #4
        Pilot questions

        Hi,

        I think that this method of adding pilot questions is very unfair. What if I spent more time on them (since they would be trickier) and lost out on my other graded questions? Shouldn't there be a better way to test pilot questions? When I took the GRE 5 years back, we were given, in addition to one set each of verbal, analytical and quantitative, another set of one of the three areas. The candidate will not know which one of the duplicate set will be graded. Each set had its own time slot and hence my overall performance was not jeopardized by my sweating over the pilot set.

        Another thought that has been bugging me is why should time itself be a factor in testing knowledge of mathematical concepts? This is not an aptitude test where your inate thinking skills are tested. Just my 2 cents (and no, it is not a question of sour grapes!). Would anyone else care to discuss this?

        Rathi

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rswami
          Hi,

          I think that this method of adding pilot questions is very unfair. What if I spent more time on them (since they would be trickier) and lost out on my other graded questions? Shouldn't there be a better way to test pilot questions? When I took the GRE 5 years back, we were given, in addition to one set each of verbal, analytical and quantitative, another set of one of the three areas. The candidate will not know which one of the duplicate set will be graded. Each set had its own time slot and hence my overall performance was not jeopardized by my sweating over the pilot set.

          Another thought that has been bugging me is why should time itself be a factor in testing knowledge of mathematical concepts? This is not an aptitude test where your inate thinking skills are tested. Just my 2 cents (and no, it is not a question of sour grapes!). Would anyone else care to discuss this?

          Rathi
          I do sort of agree with you on the first issue; I would be choked if 3 of the questions I nailed wound up not counting. I'd rather they just have them count straight up whether you get them or not. If they're unfairly hard, more people will do worse, and thus the passing grade will be lower. It all seems to work out in the end.

          As for your second complaint though, obviously they need a time limit. Your boss won't want someone who takes 8 hours to do what the rest of his employees do in 3. I had to guess on two questions I couldn't get within the three hours, and selfishly I wish "oh I just wish there was another half hour." Obviously, though, I think it's fair. It's how you (no offense) weed out the people who aren't quite as qualified at that time.

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          • #6
            I think so too, even some people say if you cannot figure out this question, skip it and jump to the other one, but sometimes if don't try to do it, u have no idea if you know how to do it or not. However, you already spent 5 to 10 mins already.
            Tears stream down your face
            I promise you I will learn from my mistakes

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Greg1983 View Post
              As for your second complaint though, obviously they need a time limit. Your boss won't want someone who takes 8 hours to do what the rest of his employees do in 3. I had to guess on two questions I couldn't get within the three hours, and selfishly I wish "oh I just wish there was another half hour." Obviously, though, I think it's fair. It's how you (no offense) weed out the people who aren't quite as qualified at that time.
              On the other hand, your boss will not want somebody who would not double check his or her work. I agree with both points of view, however. Tests should be timed (deadlines exist in the "real world") but there should be more than enough time to complete the test (that includes factoring in the time it takes to double check your work). For instance, if it takes 1/2 the time to double check your answers, exam P should be 4.5 hours! hehe

              Back to hand 1: you shouldn't associate the speed at which one solves a problem with his or her ability to solve the problem. It's well known that people think (read: process information) faster or slower than others, and that people possess varying levels of short-term memories (benefitting the 'crammer' as it may be). But neither can be used solely as indicators of one's ability to think out a problem and come up with the correct answer.

              - Junkyballs

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              • #8
                well, the exam does not only test whether you know the material or not, it also tests you on how familiar you are with the material. like I always believe, every exam have limited material and thus the types of questions possibly to be asked are limited. thus if I have done ENOUGH practice, I will have met nearly all types of questions, and no question should be hard at that point of time. and that, I think, is the point of purchasing the manuals and working on their problems over and over again.

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