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  • question about an interval notation

    In the third practice exam of ACTEX P/1, #30 gives an interval for a probability density that goes from [t, t + dt]. Is this just a fancy way of saying from t to t+1?

  • #2
    No it isn't. Mathematically speaking, dt is typically << 1, it more of an infinitesimal increment.
    sigpicThe hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax. ~ Albert Einstein

    P FM MLC MFE C
    VEEs: Economics App. Statistics Corporate Finance

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FSA_To_Be View Post
      No it isn't. Mathematically speaking, dt is typically << 1, it more of an infinitesimal increment.
      so essentially its say for instance t = 1, (1, 1+d/dt(1))?

      seems like its almost trying to quantify a probability for a point for that case then...

      i suppose its just one of those things ill need to get use to. although its the first time i ran into it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by zenkei18 View Post
        so essentially its say for instance t = 1, (1, 1+d/dt(1))?

        seems like its almost trying to quantify a probability for a point for that case then...

        i suppose its just one of those things ill need to get use to. although its the first time i ran into it.
        The interval [x, x + \epsilon), \epsilon > 0, is certainly not a point. A good way to get used to this is to take a Real Analysis class

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zenkei18 View Post
          so essentially its say for instance t = 1, (1, 1+d/dt(1))?

          seems like its almost trying to quantify a probability for a point for that case then...

          i suppose its just one of those things ill need to get use to. although its the first time i ran into it.
          What is the largest number of pieces into which a square can be divided? Infinity, right? In that case, what is the area of each square? Something very very very tiny, right? In case of 1-dimensional stuff, that very tiny thing is dt, just dont try to quantify it, it's just that.
          sigpicThe hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax. ~ Albert Einstein

          P FM MLC MFE C
          VEEs: Economics App. Statistics Corporate Finance

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NoMoreExams View Post
            The interval [x, x + \epsilon), \epsilon > 0, is certainly not a point. A good way to get used to this is to take a Real Analysis class
            im a math major and took a real analysis class. unfortunately i made a d in it. what is the likelihood ill even see anything on the exam utilizing this, it seems to be kind of a "for fun" thing in the actex manual.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by zenkei18 View Post
              im a math major and took a real analysis class. unfortunately i made a d in it. what is the likelihood ill even see anything on the exam utilizing this, it seems to be kind of a "for fun" thing in the actex manual.
              Calculus is no longer tested explicitly so no, you will not see a real analysis type question.

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