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  • What should I do in order to take the EXAM 1

    Ho there, I am a high school study and i will go to community college after this summer hoilday. I am planning to take the EXAM 1 and I will study for this exam porbably June an dduring this summer. I dont know what should I do and dont know what should i know in EXAM 1. I hope you guys can help me and answering the questions below

    First of all, i am a high school student, I just have some basic calculus background. I am not very very strong in math but ok. And I like math so much and willing speed lot of time on it.

    Q1: I see many text books on the internet, which one i should buy for EXAM 1?
    p.s I want to buy one which include example and solution and note. Becasue I dont know anything

    Q2: How long did you guys use for prepare EXAM 1?

    That's all of my questions! Thanks every one!

  • #2
    Exam 1

    CAS calls this exam 1, SOA calls it exam P. You must know three semesters of calculus before you even start studying for it, and having a calculus-based probability class helps -- the exam is on calculus-based probability. I wrote the study manual that has all that you ask for, you can see it at: http://www.studymanuals.com/exam1.htm. There are, of course, other study manuals.

    Yours,
    Krzys' Ostaszewski
    Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by krzysio
      CAS calls this exam 1, SOA calls it exam P. You must know three semesters of calculus before you even start studying for it, and having a calculus-based probability class helps -- the exam is on calculus-based probability. I wrote the study manual that has all that you ask for, you can see it at: http://www.studymanuals.com/exam1.htm. There are, of course, other study manuals.

      Yours,
      Krzys' Ostaszewski

      But you know, i am a Hong Kong student and just finished the HKCEE, and i never learn calculus there, but i will go to community college after this summer 2005. And i will take as many maths as i can, do you think is that work?
      anyway, thanks for your help

      AvonT

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AvonT
        But you know, i am a Hong Kong student and just finished the HKCEE, and i never learn calculus there, but i will go to community college after this summer 2005. And i will take as many maths as i can, do you think is that work?
        anyway, thanks for your help

        AvonT
        You can try. Picking up calculus and understanding it will be important for you to get through the first 4 exams.

        Comment


        • #5
          Exam P

          Originally posted by krzysio
          CAS calls this exam 1, SOA calls it exam P. You must know three semesters of calculus before you even start studying for it, and having a calculus-based probability class helps -- the exam is on calculus-based probability. I wrote the study manual that has all that you ask for, you can see it at: http://www.studymanuals.com/exam1.htm. There are, of course, other study manuals.

          Yours,
          Krzys' Ostaszewski

          Will this manual help me to learn more calculas if I do not have 3 semesters of calculus??? I recently graduated with an accounting and finance degree and I am planning on taking exam P. If you could let me know I would appreciate it. Thanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Calculus

            Originally posted by base17
            Will this manual help me to learn more calculas if I do not have 3 semesters of calculus??? I recently graduated with an accounting and finance degree and I am planning on taking exam P. If you could let me know I would appreciate it. Thanks.
            The background in calculus is needed regardless. You will need it quite a lot later on, as well, not just on exam P. Calculus is quite a universal subject and there are many textbooks for it -- is it difficult for you to get a textbook for a long three-semester calculus course, including multivariate calculus and series? I do not know the situation in Hongkong, but in the U.S. where I reside, calculus textbooks are commonly available in university libraries and bookstores. Here is a link to Thomas & Finney's textbook at Amazon.com:
            http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books
            You do need to learn calculus, but you could try studying for exam P and studying calculus simultaneously. This will require a lot of motivation, and self-discipline, but you will need it for actuarial exams anyway.

            I hope this helps.

            Yours,
            Krzys'
            Last edited by krzysio; October 8 2005, 08:09 AM.
            Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by AvonT
              I am not very very strong in math but ok. And I like math so much and willing speed lot of time on it.
              It's tough to get through the first exam, let alone into the profession, if you don't have a lot of natural skill at math.

              I don't want to discourage you, but you might want to try taking some more statistics and calculus classes in college before you start to directly invest in study materials for exam P.

              Comment


              • #8
                I've not yet taken exam P, but I'm in my third semester of calculus, and although I'm rather good at calculus, and find it easier than many of my classmates, it isn't something you pick up overnight. I'd say learning three semesters of calculus, for a bright, extremely dedicated student on his own would take a minimum of 3-5 months (random educated guess there).

                The main thing you pick up is that EVERYTHING builds up on what is learned previously. If there's ever a specific aspect you have difficulty with, it WILL bite you later if you don't crack down and concentrate on your deficiencies. A good mind for computational and modeling strategies helps.

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                • #9
                  And yes, it is extremely easy to find even textbooks that cover four semesters of calculus (if you add differential equations). There are literally 10-20 editions of particular titles.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I almost never use what I learned or didn't learn in calc III. The two most useful things were partial derivatives and double integrals, but it's not like you need to be taught those.
                    Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Calculus III

                      Some parts of third semester of calculus, for example ideas related to the Stokes Theorem, are not tested even indirectly on actuarial exams. But multiple integrals and partial derivatives are important -- I am not quite sure if multiple integrals are really that easy, though. The skill that is tested over and over is the ability to change the order of integration on a two-dimensional region that is not a rectangle.

                      Yours,
                      Krzys'
                      Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Can you give me titles to textbooks that cover the 4 semesters in calculus? I plan on taking exam p and do not have any kind of calculus background. Thanks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          strong calculus is an absolute necessity for passing exam P. i failed exam p miserably the first time i took it (got a 3!). the reason was that when i was studying for the test, i didnt do a thorough review of calculus. for the Sept 2005 sitting i reviewed my entire calculus textbook ( i skipped some selected parts that i knew would not be tested) before i started doing practice exams and it helped a ton. i passed exam p with grade 10. i jumped 7 points primarily because i went in with calculus fresh in my mind.
                          things from calculus that you need to know:
                          l'hospital's rule
                          chain rule differentiation and integration
                          integration by parts
                          infinite series (geometric series, p-series, alternating series,...)
                          partial fractions
                          trigonometric substitution
                          differentiation and integration of transcedental functions
                          change of variables in integration
                          partial differentiation

                          of course, you must have a strong command of basic limits, differentiation and integration to tackle some of the concepts i listed above.

                          i know it would be nice to pass the test right out of high school, but make sure that you get a complete calculus based education first. it will open up doors to probability and statistics, financial mathematics, economics, and much more. its importance cant be understated.

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