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Which discrete and continuous distributions for exam 1/p?

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  • Which discrete and continuous distributions for exam 1/p?

    Deleted this post
    Last edited by Sujan; December 24 2009, 12:12 PM.

  • #2
    Distributions on the exam

    This is what the syllabus says:

    "Univariate probability distributions (including binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, chi-square, beta, Pareto, lognormal, gamma, Weibull, and normal)"

    as well as

    "Multivariate probability distributions (including the bivariate normal)"

    I remember many, many times when I studied for actuarial exams that I would look at some things, and think to myself "They can't possibly expect me to memorize this." When "this" was then on the test, I got a 5. Don't get a 5, learn as much as you can about all distributions listed in the syllabus.

    Yours,
    Krzys'
    Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

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    • #3
      Hi,
      Do we need to know Chebyshev's inequality for the exam? If yes what kind of question would it be.

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      • #4
        Yes.

        Last May there was a question asking you to use Chebyshev's. It was pretty straitforward.

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        • #5
          Thanks Quint but what about Markov processes
          Last edited by azik; October 30 2005, 08:48 PM.

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          • #6
            Markov processes

            Originally posted by azik
            Thanks Quint but what about Markov processes
            Markov processes are not on exam P. Have a look at the syllabus on the SOA or CAS web site, it tells you quite precisely what is on the exam.
            Good luck.

            Yours,
            Krzys'
            Want to know how to pass actuarial exams? Go to: smartURL.it/pass

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            • #7
              Would you say that for all of the distributions asked for on the exam, one should know the mean and variance formulae (when applicable)?

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              • #8
                Absolutely.

                Memorize the main distributions, exactly what situations they are applicable in, and also their respective means and variances.

                To be honest, you probably don't need a number of the distributions listed in this thread.

                The ones to know everything about: binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential.

                Also know the basic information (don't need to memorize the exact distribution or mean/variance) for chi-square, beta, Pareto, lognormal, gamma, and Weibull. Others might argue with me, but when I studied for this test in May, the FSA I studied with didn't go over these at all.

                Also spend a lot of time on the normal distribution. You probably don't need to know the formula, but it's not that hard to memorize. Also definately know how to manipulate and calculate normal distributions (sum of two normals, normal approximations, etc.).
                Last edited by Quint; November 4 2005, 10:49 PM.

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                • #9
                  Thank you - I'm currently in an intro to probability course (we just started Normal distribution, with tables (are the tables given on exam?) - I'm making sure I learn everything 5 times more than required (he doesn't require memorized formulae) and during the winter break, I'll be using the Actex manual.

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                  • #10
                    Tables are givin for normal distribution calcs.

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